ISD109 – Introduction to Islamic Art and Architecture


Syllabus

  • Historical overview and Historiography of Islamic Art
  • Calligraphy and calligraphic art of the Qur’an
  • Arts of the book: painted and illuminated manuscripts
  • Textiles
  • Ceramics
  • Metalwork
  • Islamic ornament (geometry, arabesque) and the question of figural representation in Islam
  • Islamic religious architecture: mosques and shrines
  • Urban planning: baths, gardens and palaces
  • Funerary landscape: tombs and mausoleums

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Present a structured and coherent analysis of Islamic art themes based on religious, theological and philosophical aspects of Islamic Cultures and Civilisation (A2)
  • Discuss important factors related to aesthetic appreciation of Islamic art (A3, A6)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Communicate ideas about different aspects of Islamic art by gathering and processing information and artwork from a variety of paper, audio-visual and electronic sources (B2, B4, B5, C1, C4, D1, D2, D4, D5)
  • Be able to write a catalogue entry and/or object report on a museum artefact of student’s choice.

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The main means of course delivery will be through lectures, seminars, presentations, class discussions and exercises. Students are required to write cultural visit reports encouraging analysis and critical reflection. Using a variety of materials, teaching is organised around themes such as a region (Syria, or Iran), a chronological period (1st Century of Islam), or a topic (royal iconography). 

Assessment Scheme

Formative Assessment
Formative, ungraded assessment for this module is by means of discussions, questions and feedback from cultural visits as well as feedback on the student report.  Students will also receive formative feedback on their presentations after completing them which will help them improve in future performance. They may also hand in their drafts to the lecturer for feedback and guidance.

Summative Assessment
Assessment will consist of a presentation and a written report. The 20 minute presentation will require students to convey their research on an agreed area of the course in an effective manner and should consist of roughly 10 Powerpoint slides (Otcome 2, 3).The length of the report should fall within 1000 words [Outcomes 1, 4].

Assessment Weighting
Written report: 50%
Presentation: 50%

Learning Materials

Core Readings

  • http://www.discoverislamicart.org
  • https://arthistoriography.wordpress.com/number-6-june-2012-2/
  • The Arts of Islam (1976) London: Arts Council of Great Britain.
  • Augis, D. A. & R. Hitchcock (eds) (1994) The Arab Influence in Medieval Europe, Reading.
  • Blair, Sheila (1998) Islamic Inscriptions, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
  • Bloom, J. (1997) Islamic Arts Phaidon Press.
  • Bloom, J. & S. Blair (eds) (2009) The Grove Encyclopedia of Islamic Art and Architecture, Oxford.
  • Creswell K.A.C. (1989) A Short Account of Early Muslim Architecture, Scolar Press.
  • Ettinghausen, RIchard (1977) Arab Painting, New York: Skira-Rizzoli.
  • Ettinghausen M. and Grabar O. (1987) The Art and Architecture of Islam 650-1250, Pelican.
  • Hillenbrand R. (1999) Islamic Art and Architecture:The World of Art, New York: Thames and Hudson.
  • Hattstein, M., and Delius, P. (2007), Islam. Art and Architecture Könemann, Königswinter.
  • Michell, G. (ed) (1978) Architecture of the Islamic world : its history and social meaning, London.

ISD104 – Introduction to Islamic Philosophy


Syllabus

The module traces back philosophical thinking to its earliest period in the Islamic era. It examines such towering figures of Islamic philosophy as Kindi, Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ghazali, Ibn Rushd, Ibn Hazm, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Bajjah, Suhrawardi, Ibn al-Arabi, Nasir al-Din Tusi and Mulla Sadra. The course discusses the central issues and concepts of Islamic philosophy, including existence and essence, God’s existence and knowledge of the world, knowledge and its foundations, cosmology and causality. These concepts are examined from the point of view of different philosophical perspectives, most notably those of the Peripatetic, Illuminationist and Transcendental schools. The module also explores the relationship between philosophy and religion and the attitude taken by Muslim philosophers towards Greek philosophical texts.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
Upon completion of this module, a successful student will be able to:

  • Identify the main concepts and questions in Islamic philosophy and major philosophical schools in Islam. (A1, A3, B4)
  • Examine the main points of controversy and basic issues in Islamic philosophy. (B2, B3)

Skills
This module will require a successful student to:

  • Analyse the relation between science, philosophy, and faith. (B2, B5, C1, C2, D1, D3)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

Alongside lectures, students are expected to develop their learning through research and preparation leading to a research based essay. Seminars are used to debate and explore specific issues while the use of questioning and small group work in class ensures that students are constantly engaged and take an active role in the learning process.

Assessment strategy

Formative Assessment:
Participation in debates on a question around topics covered within class provides students the basis formative assessment, whereby students will be expected to present the case for or against a particular position and the quality of their argument be judged by peers. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment:
Summative, graded assessment is by coursework and written examination. The coursework will require students to write an essay of 1,500 words that demonstrates a critical understanding of one of the main topics covered in class. A 2-hour written examination will take place at the end of the semester.

Assessment weighting
Coursework: 40%
Written examination: 60%

Learning Materials

Core reading

  • Tabataba’i, S.M.H. (2003). The Elements of Islamic Metaphysics. Translated from Arabic by S.A.Q.
  • Qara’ie. London: ICAS Press.
  • Ubodiyat, A. (2000). An Introduction to Islamic Philosophy. F. Asadi & M. Dasht Bozorgi trans.,
  • Qum: The International Organisation of Seminaries and Islamic Schools.

ISD110 – Islamic Theology 1


Syllabus

This module will introduce the students to theology by reviewing the historical development of theological schools while also providing the students with a grounding in the current debates between theists and atheists about the existence of God through an exploration of the relationship between science and religion. Over the course of the module, students will be exploring the common arguments for God’s existence, including the various teleological, cosmological, and ontological proofs offered by theologians from both the Western and Islamic worlds. Topics that may be explored by students include:

  • Ways of understanding the science-religion relationship.
  • Religion and science in medieval European and Islamic contexts
  • The roots of the “clash” narrative in the late 19th-century.
  • Modern science, disenchantment and the secular.
  • Anthropic arguments and the multiverse.
  • The cosmological argument and quantum physics.
  • The ontological argument and materialism.
  • The problem of evil and religious theodicies.
  • Theological arguments for God’s existence.
  • The historical development of theological schools in Islam

Learning outcomes

Knowledge
Upon completion of this module, a successful student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness and explain the similarities and contrasts between the disciplines of science, theology and philosophy. (A5)
  • Analyse the way in which scientific concepts and theories affect classical debates within theology. (A3, A5)
  • Identify and provide an outline of the debates surrounding different proofs for God’s existence. (A1, B4)
  • Demonstrate awareness in Identifying the origins, development and history of Islamic doctrine. (A5, A6)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Examine and engage in debates on the relation between science and theology. (B4-B5, C2, C4, D1, D3)
  • Point out logical and well-thought-out arguments while assessing the views of others. (B2-B4, C2, C4, C6, D2-4)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

In addition to attending lectures, students are expected to augment their learning through research and preparation leading to a research-based essay. Seminars are used to debate and explore specific issues while the use of questioning and small group work in class ensures that students are constantly engaged and take an active role in the learning process.

Assessment Modes

Formative Assessment:
Questions arising from lectures form the basis formative assessment, through small group discussions leading to the development of theological understanding. Each portfolio assignment is entitled to formative feedback from the module leader before the 10th learning week. Students are required to see the module leader regularly to receive feedback and support with their portfolio work. Additionally, tutorial time enables the module leader to give guidance to students on topics of concern and provide constructive feedback related to portfolio work. Revision sessions are also arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment:
Summative, graded assessment for this module consists of portfolio and a written examination. The portfolio will consist of two assignments of 1,500 words each (Outcomes 5, 6). The 2 hour written examination will take place at the end of the semester (Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4).

Assessment Weighting
Portfolio: 50%
Written Examination: 50%

Learning Material

Core Reading

  • Copan, P. & Moser, P. K. eds., (2003) The Rationality of Theism, London: Routledge.
  • Dawkins, R., (2007) The God Delusion, London: Black Swan.
  • Mutahhari, M., (2002). Understanding Islamic Sciences. London: ICAS.

ISC103 – Life of the Prophet


Syllabus

  • Pre-Islamic Arabia and the Prophet’s early life
  • The primary message and the leading Meccan opposition
  • The persecution in Mecca and the migrations
  • The Constitution of Medina
  • Mecca versus Medina
  • The return to Mecca
  • The social reforms of the Prophet
  • The Farewell Pilgrimage
  • The final days of the Prophet
  • The Prophet’s succession
  • Images of the Prophet in Medieval non-Muslim and Orientalists

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Examine basic approach between the religious side of the Prophet and the Prophet as a man with historical connation (A1).
  • Identify the reasons behind the formation of the Muslim society in Medina rather than Mecca (A5, B2).
  • Distinguish the role of the Prophetic period in forming the moral outlook of the Muslim mind (A4, B5).

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Identify, collect and organize historical primary sources and use sources effectively. (B6, C1, C5, D5)
  • Formulate written material accurately in the form of an essay effectively, arguing and debating historical narratives (B5, C4, D3)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The module will be taught through lectures, which will allow time for discussions. Students work will be developed through search of primary and secondary sources.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment is an important part of the learning process and has been shown to help improve both grades and learning style.  As students you receive formative feedback in a variety of ways, orally, in writing, to the whole class or individually. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment:
Summative assessment for this module is by coursework and written exam. A 1,500 words word coursework will be written on a title agreed by the lecturer (Outcomes 4, 5). One draft of each coursework may be handed in to the lecturer before the 6th and 9th learning week respectively for formative assessment, in which the lecturer will give the student feedback on how to improve their research and quality of writing. The 2 hour written exam will take place at the end of the semester (Outcomes 1, 2, 3).

Assessment Weighting
Coursework: 40%
Written exam: 60%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Dabashi, H. (2017). Authority in Islam: From the Rise of Mohammad to the Establishment of the Umayyads. Routledge.
  • Ibn Ishaq, M. (1982) The Life of Muhammad, A. Guillame (trans.), Oxford University Press Watt, W.M. (1991) Muhammad at Mecca, OUP Pakistan: Oxford University Press. Watt, W.M. (1991) Muhammad at Medina, New Ed edition. ed, OUP Pakistan: Karachi ; New York.

ISC119 – Islamic Moral Values


Syllabus

To achieve the goals of the modules the students are tasked with independently researching specific issues related to Islamic morality and preparing class-room presentations in the forms of lectures. The first few sessions of the module are spent with guest lecturers whom will give practical advice on how to deliver lectures. Topics that may be explored by students include:

  • Pride and arrogance
  • Remembrance of death
  • Truthfulness
  • Piety and taqwa
  • Repentance
  • Ostentation
  • Envy
  • Tafakkur (pondering)
  • Hypocrisy
  • Reliance on God
  • Patience
  • Thankfulness
  • Intentions

Learning outcomes

Knowledge
 On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Identify and outline the main concepts of Islamic moral values. (A1)
  • Distinguish and apply the main features of Islamic moral values from their primary sources. (A2)

Skills
 This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Point out verses and stories of the Qur’an, the main thrust of which are morality and moral values; and use appropriate ahadith to provide support for explaining normative values. (B1- B3, B5, C1, C4, D3)
  • Present findings and be able participate in class discussions. (B4, B5, C2, C4, D2)
  • Demonstrate awareness of reflective learning by reviewing considered thoughts and ideas of scholars. (D1)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The lessons will consist of taught sessions by the lecturer and guest speakers, students are expected to develop their learning through research and preparation leading to a research based presentation. The use of questioning, discussion participation and small group work in class ensures that students are constantly engaged and take an active role in the learning process.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment involves participating in ethical discussion on topics covered in class. As part of the formative learning process each student will meet with the module leader in order to discuss their book review. A draft of the book review may be submitted for formative assessment before the 10th week. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, addressing student understanding and providing constructive formative feedback to students.  Also tutorial time enables the module leader to give guidance to students on topics of concern and provide constructive feedback related to summative work.

Summative Assessment:
Summative, graded assessment for this module consists of book review and a written examination. The book review will consist of two assignments of 500 words each (Outcomes 4, 5). This will require students to demonstrate their learning of key skills and concepts by reviewing brooks with a particular moral theme as mentioned in the Qur’an and Hadith. The 2 hour written examination will take place at the end of the year (Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4).

Assessment Weighting
Book Review: 50%
Written Examination: 50%

Learning Materials

Core Reading

  • al-‘Amili, al-Hurr. (2003) Combat with the Self, London: ICAS Press

ISC114 – Arabic – 1


Syllabus

The introduction to Arabic Grammer is made through the following topics, while linking the topics to themes in culture and spoken Arabic:

  • The alphabets, vowels and other extra-alphabetical symbols; the Sun & Moon letters and their significance; the definite article; Some prepositions; Arabic Numerals; Basic arithmetic in Arabic, some adjectives; pronouns; conjunctions;
  • Masculine & Feminine, the Definite article, Nisbah adjectives
  • Independent Pronouns; Plurals – Sound Masculine, Sound Feminine & Broken; Nominal sentence
  • Possession construct, suffix pronouns
  • Present Tense; verbal sentences
  • Relative pronouns, phrases vs. sentences, adverbs
  • Verbal Nouns, Accusative particle LI ANNA
  • Prepositions, Precedence of Predicate, ‘To be’ in the past tense, How much/many
  • Past Tense, Roots and Forms/patterns, Arabic Dictionary, Numbers 11-100
  • Laysa, Ordinal numbers, telling the time
  • Present Subjunctive, and prepositions

Learning outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module the successful student will be able to:

  • Read, write and speak basic Arabic with textbook vocabulary. (A6)
  • Identify and discover the differences in formal written and spoken Arabic (A6)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Be able Identify and form some of the basic structures of Modern Standard Arabic and read Arabic with diacritical marks. (C3, C6, D1)
  • Apply Arabic Grammar to formal written and spoken Arabic. (D2)
  • Be able to take part in translating sentences from Arabic into English. (D1, D4)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The module will be taught through lectures, class exercise and conversation, discussion, listing to DVD records of native speakers on different occasions listed in the textbook and group tutorials conducted in the spoken hours of the module.  Students will present and discuss work in progress.  Students are expected to develop their skill independently and in group environment. Students should attend class well prepared and complete assignments on time. All assignments must be handed in at the beginning of class on due date. Developing language skills in an on-going process requires regular study, practice at home and in class; hence regular attendance is essential.

Assessment Modes

Formative Assessment:
Students are set bi-weekly formative assignments on Arabic, and receive feedback as they are handed in throughout the year. Although portfolios are done during class, students are required to see the module leader regularly in tutorials to receive formative feedback on their performance and support with their portfolio work. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, continuously strengthening and developing students’ competence in the Arabic language.  Moreover, tutorial time enables the module leader to supported continuously while providing the opportunity for constant engagement with the language, and constructive feedback related to the development of language skills.

Summative Assessment:
Summative, graded assessment is by portfolio, which will comprise of three exercises to be completed in class, of around 350 words each, on syllabus topics assigned by the lecturer (Outcomes 3, 4, 5). Additionally, a 2 hour written examination will take place at the end of the yearlong module (Outcomes 1, 2).

Assessment Weighting
Portfolio: 30%
Written examination: 70%

Learning materials

Core Reading

  • Brustad, K., Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi (2006), Al Kitaab Fii Tačallum al-čArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic Part One Georgetown University Press; 2nd Bk & DVD edition.

ISC116 – Introduction to Islamic Law


Syllabus

The module will introduce students to important concepts whilst walking them through the historical development of Islamic law. It will cover:

  • Concept of Divine Law: definition of sharia and its jurisdiction
  • Five categories of rulings
  • Islamic law during the life time of the Prophet, Companions and Imams
  • The position of the Prophet and his successors in the development of Islamic law
  • Formative period, articulation of legal theories
  • History, founders, development, and distinct qualities of major schools of Islamic law:
  • Hanafi, Maliki, Hanbali, Shafi’i, Ithna ‘Ashari
  • History, founders, development, and distinct qualities of other schools of Islamic law: Zaydi, Zahiri, Ibadi, Isma’ili
  • Major jurists, their biographies and works
  • Introductions to the four sources of Islamic Law: Qur’an, Sunnah, qiyas/’aql and ijma’
  • Ijtihad and taqlid
  • Introduction to usul al-fiqh
  • Tolerance in Islamic Law and diversity of opinions
  • Modern developments in Islamic law

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
 On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Identify the main schools of Islamic law and the significant differences in their approaches to legal issues. (A1)
  • Identify and present an overview of the main topics, providing an outline of the main terms in Islamic law (A1)
  • Examine the history and formation of different schools of Islamic law and their later developments. (A2, A7, A5)

Skills
 This module will call for successful student to:

  • Formulate material accurately and present findings orally and be able to participate in class discussion. (B1, C2, C3, D2, D3)
  • Formulate written material accurately in the form of an essay effectively, arguing and debating historical narratives (B3, B4, B5, C4, D3)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The basic structure of the module will be provided by the lectures, within which time will be allocated for group work. There will also be seminars to discuss controversial issues. Individual study will consist of general reading, specific historical texts and reading on specific topics. A number of topics will be selected for special reading and seminar discussion. Students will also benefit from supervised presentations.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment is through co-ordinated independent study of reading material, followed by discussion in class to supplement topics covered and is an essential element of the programme. Students may hand in their PowerPoint slides to the lecturer for guidance prior to the 9th learning week. They will also receive formative feedback on their presentations after completing them, and guidance and feedback can be gained from student-led discussion, which will help them improve future performance. Moreover, the module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process.

Summative Assessment:
Assessment is by presentation and coursework. The 20 minute presentation will require students to convey their research on an agreed area of the course in an effective manner, and should consist of roughly 10 PowerPoint slides (Outcome 3, 4). The coursework will require the student to write an essay of 3,000 words examining topics covered as part of the module. (Outcomes 1,2, 5)

Assessment Weighting
Presentation: 40%
Coursework: 60%

Learning Materials

Core Reading

  • Hallaq, W. (2016) The Formation of Islamic Law, Oxon: Routledge.
  • Kamali, M. H. (2008) Shari’ah Law: An Introduction, Oxford: Oneworld Publications Schacht, J. (1982) An introduction to Islamic law. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

ISC115 – The Formative Period of Islam


Syllabus

The module will cover two important periods: the life of the Prophet and the era of the caliphate leading up to the establishment of the Umayyad dynasty. It will discuss topics such as:

  • The Prophet’s Succession and the Quraish Rule
  • The five caliphs after the Prophet
  • Abu Bakr, ‘Umar and the selection committee (shura)
  • Caliphate system crisis: ‘Uthman and Banu Umayya
  • Imam Ali’s Caliphate in Kufa
  • Imam al-Hasan’s caliphate
  • The evolvement of Imamite trends
  • The birth of the Khawarij

Learning outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Differentiate, in approach, the process of leadership in early Islam and outline theories behind the fundamental differences that exist between the institutions of Caliphate and Imamate. (A2, A3)
  • Compare and examine the relationship between Islamic themes and their historical context. (A7)
  • Analyse factors concerning encounters between the Muslims and other civilizations. (A8)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Select, collect and organize historical primary sources and use sources effectively. (B6, C1, C5, D5)
  • Formulate material accurately and present research accurately and concisely, both in written form and verbally. (C1, C2, C4, C5, D1- D3, D6)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

This module is taught through the medium of lectures, discussions, seminars, independent research and presentations. Students will be encouraged to engage in discussions facilitated by the lecturer in order to learn from others, collaborate and share their understanding of the issues covered. Students work will be developed through class work in groups and search of primary and secondary sources.  Students will present and discuss their work in progress in the class, as they are expected to develop their personal skill along with their teamwork.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment is an important part of the learning process and has been shown to help improve both grades and learning style.  As students you receive formative feedback in a variety of ways, orally, in writing, to the whole class or individually. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Students may hand in their PowerPoint slides to the lecturer for guidance prior to the 9th learning week. They will also receive formative feedback on their presentations after completing them, and guidance and feedback can be gained from student-led discussion, which will help them improve future performance.

Summative Assessment:
Summative assessment for this module is by presentation and written exam. The 20 minute presentation will require students to convey their research on an agreed area of the course in an effective manner, and should consist of roughly 10 PowerPoint slides (Outcomes 4, 5). The 2-hour written exam will take place at the end of the semester (Outcomes 1, 2, 3).

Assessment Weighting
Written exam: 60%
Presentation: 40%

Learning Materials

Core Reading

  • Dabashi, H. (2017). Authority in Islam: From the Rise of Mohammad to the Establishment of the Umayyads. Routledge.
  • Kennedy, H. (2015). The Prophet and the age of the Caliphates: the Islamic Near East from the sixth to the eleventh century. Routledge.
  • Jačfaryān, Rasul (2003), History of the Caliphs from the death of the messenger to the decline of the Umayyad dynasty 11-132 AH, Qum, Ansariyan.
  • Madelung, W. (1997) The Succession to Muhammad: A Study of the Early Caliphate, Cambridge University Press.
  • Qarashi, B.S. (2010). The Ahlulbayt Encyclopaedia. Qum: Ansariyan Publications.

ISC111 – Research Methodology for Islamic Studies


Syllabus

  • Research methods particular to Islamic Studies
  • Research methodology and Quran
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Essay writing skills for academic purposes
  • Research process and essay structure
  • Preparation of a research proposal
  • Literature review and its role in academic research
  • Writing a research report
  • Presentation of a research report and peer reviewing techniques
  • Using the internet and software for research in Islamic studies
  • Major resources in Islamic studies

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Examine the requirements for researching and presenting a project. (A1, A5)
  • Identify the main sources in various aspects of Islamic studies. (A2)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Identify and provide an appropriate structure and style for writing an essay. (B6, C1, C3, C6, D3)
  • Select an appropriate citation and referencing style for academic writing. (B6, C2, D5, D6)
  • Employ suitable research methods to investigate a subject matter in the field of Islamic studies (C3, C5)
  • Demonstrate awareness of reflective learning by expressing considered thoughts and ideas in the form of a self-reflective journal (D1)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

Alongside lectures and seminars, students are expected to develop their learning through research and preparation leading to a research based essay. Seminars are used to debate and explore specific issues while the use of questioning and debate in class ensures that students are constantly engaged and take an active role in the learning process. All students are assigned a mentor from amongst the third year Project students who will give them advice and support relating to their coursework.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment will be Module leader led seminars and workshops, students will discuss and presented topics. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Students will also be asked to complete and submit a weekly reflective learning exercise based on the teaching and learning, student will be provided feedback regarding it and discuss the student’s progress and areas for future exploration. This is based on their formative learning process and students will be encouraged to complete these tasks to improve learning and satisfaction with the module.

Summative Assessment:
Summative assessment for this module is by means of coursework and self-reflective journal. Students are required to write a coursework of 2,500 words on a subject of their own choice in the field of Islamic studies in which they are expected to demonstrate their learning of research methods and written presentation skills (Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Students will be further required to produce three self-reflective journals of about 500 words each. The journal is expected to reflect personal development and discussions in the class. Every journal must be submitted every four weeks. The journal is a necessary component of the module and   part of the overall assessment. (Outcome 6).

Assessment Weighting
Coursework: 70%
Journal: 30%

Learning materials

Core Reading

  • Booth, W.C., Colomb, G.G., Williams, J.M. (2003). 2nd ed. The Craft of Research. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Nicholas Walliman, N. (2017) Research Methods: The Basics: 2nd edition
  • Routledge. Cottrell, S. (2017) Critical Thinking Skills: Effective Analysis, Argument and Reflection,
  • Macmillan International Higher Education,
  • Cottrell, S. (2011) Critical Thinking Skills: Developing Effective Analysis and Argument, Palgrave Macmillan

ISD117 – Qur’anic Sciences and Approaches to Exegesis


Syllabus

The Qur’anic Sciences part of the module examines:

  • What is meant by Revelation?
  • The seven modes (ahruf) of the Qur’an and different recitations (qira’at)
  • Clear and ambiguous verses (muhkam and mutashabih)
  • Abrogation (naskh)
  • The question of alteration and distortion of the Qur’an (tahrif)
  • Compilation of the Qur’an
  • Relevant concepts of Qur’anic sciences, such as: the disjointed letters (huruf muqatta’ah), reasons of revelation (asbab al-nuzul), and the arrangement of verses and chapters of the Qur’an.

The Approaches to Exegesis part of the module examines:

  • The historical development of Qur’anic exegesis, especially during the time of the Prophet, his Companions, Successors and Imams from the Ahl al-Bayt
  • The need for Qur’anic exegesis, its possibility and permissibility
  • The concept of ta’wil (esoteric interpretation) and its accepted criteria
  • Exegetical methods and approaches
  • The expertise required by an exegete
  • Sources used in exegesis

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Examine the continuation and preservation of the Qur’an as it was revealed to the Prophet of Islam. (A2)
  • Define two key concepts, tafsir (exegesis) and ta’wil (esoteric interpretation) and their relationship to the literal meaning of the Qur’an. (A1)
  • Analyse key concepts discussed in mainstream sciences of the Qur’an and exegetical approaches. (A1)
  • Compare and evaluate opinions held by scholars in exegetical approaches. (A3, B2, B4)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to identify and explain exegetical methods and approaches, and examine opinions held by scholars on Qur’anic sciences. (B2, C1, D1, D5)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

A variety of teaching and learning methods are used, including lectures, assignments, class discussion and individual study. The use of questioning and small group work in class ensures that students are constantly engaged and take an active role in the learning process. Students are expected to undertake independent study consisting of set and free reading.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Questions arising from lectures form the basis formative assessment, through small group discussions leading the development of exegetical skills. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Moreover, tutorial time enables Tutors to give constructive feedback to student on the preparation and development of their case studies. Tutorials will not be assessed but will form part of the formative learning process, and would help develop students’ learning and enhance their final submissions.

Summative Assessment:
Summative, graded assessment is by coursework and case study. The coursework will require the student to write an essay of 2,500 words examining topics agreed on Qur’anic Sciences as part of the module. (Outcomes 1,2, 5) The case study will be of 1,500 words in which students will be required to examine scholarly exegetical approaches in relation to syllabus topics discussed in class (Outcomes 3, 4, 5).

Assessment Weighting
Coursework: 50%
Case Study: 50%

Learning Materials

Core Reading

  • Bahmanpour, A. ed. (2012), A Student’s Guide to Qur’anic Sciences and Shi’a Exegesis, London: ICAS Press
  • Jaffer, A. and M. (2009). Quranic Sciences. London: ICAS Press