ISC204 – Islamic Philosophy


Syllabus

Over the course of this module, students will see the importance of metaphysics as a cornerstone of the Islamic sciences, and how our answers metaphysical questions ultimately impact discussions in other fields, such as theology, ethics, and mysticism. This module will also tie basic concepts and current issues to classical debates in the history of Islamic philosophy.

Topics covered include:

  • Existence and quiddity.
  • Modalities of existence.
  • Existence in-the-world versus existence in-the-mind.
  • Essence and accident.
  • Universals and particulars.
  • Aristotelian categories.
  • Causality.
  • Potentiality and actuality.
  • Unity and multiplicity.
  • Philosophical theology.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
Upon completion of this module, a successful student will be able to:

  • Evaluate the basic ideas and terms invoked in contemporary Islamic metaphysics. (A4, A8)
  • Debate the main points of controversy and debates within contemporary Islamic metaphysics. (A1)
  • Describe judgements about competing views in metaphysical debates.(A4, B1)

Skills
This module will require a successful student to:

  • Discuss ideas at different levels of abstraction, to develop logical and well-thought-out arguments, and to critically assess the views of others. (B4, B5, C2-C4, D2-D4)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

In addition to attending lectures, students are expected to augment their learning through research and preparation leading to a research-based essay. Seminars are used to debate and explore specific issues while the use of questioning and small group work in class ensures that students are constantly engaged and take an active role in the learning process. Furthermore, the module will involve a systematic study of a modern work on metaphysics, and students are encouraged to critically examine the text and carry out further research on the topics it deals with, as well as engaging in independent study circles to discuss it with their classmates and enhance their understanding and retention of its contents and arguments.

Assessment strategy

Formative Assessment
Participation in debates on a question around topics covered within class provides students the basis formative assessment, whereby students will be expected to present the case for or against a particular position and the quality of their argument be judged by peers. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment
Summative, graded assessment is by coursework and written examination. The coursework will require students to write an essay of 3,000 words that demonstrates a critical understanding of one of the main topics covered in class (Outcome 4). A 2-hour written examination will take place at the end of the semester. (Outcomes 1, 2, 3).

Assessment weighting
Coursework: 40%
Written examination: 60%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Tabataba’i, S. M. H. (2003). The Elements of Islamic Metaphysics. Qara’i trans., London: ICAS Press.
  • Misbah Yazdi, M.T. (1999). Philosophical Instructions: An Introduction to Contempoary Islamic Philosophy. Binghamton: Global Publications.
  • Ubodiyat, A. (2000). An Introduction to Islamic Philosophy. F. Asadi & M. Dasht Bozorgi trans., Qum: The International Organisation of Seminaries and Islamic Schools.

ISD226 – Current Issues in Muslim Societies


Syllabus

The main issues explored are:

  • Islam and democracy
    • Fundamentalism
  • Islam and human rights
    • Integration
    • Hijab
  • Islam and terrorism
    • Suicide bombing
  • Islam and issues in medical ethics
    • Contraception
    • Abortion
    • Artificial insemination
    • Euthanasia
    • Organ transplantation

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Evaluate key contemporary debates in a Muslim context. (A1, A5)
  • Represent an overview of the broader picture of Islam as understood by different modern Muslim thinkers. (A3)
  • Summarize and evaluate key points raised in a debate on current issues in Muslim societies. (A5, B2)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Build appropriate methods to identify, gather and organize information on current issues from primary and secondary sources and use them effectively. (B5, C2, C5, D6)
  • Verbally argue and challenge modern and traditional understanding of Islamic issues. (B4, C1, C3, C4, D2, D3)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The module will be taught through lectures, discussion, and seminars. Students work will be developed through class work and search of primary and secondary sources. Certain topics will be addressed in round table discussions.

Assessment Scheme

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment involves an in-depth search and review of publications related to the specific paper will be required. Students will receive formative feedback on their debate performance after completing them which will help them improve for future debates. They may also hand in their debate notes to the lecturer for feedback and guidance, and discuss and clarify and outstanding issues before the debate commences. Additionally, as part of the formative learning process each student will meet at least once with the module leader in order to discuss their critical learning for their assessed essay. The tutorial or meeting will not be assessed but will form part of the formative learning process with constructive feedback given to the student. A draft of the critical review may be submitted for formative assessment before the 10th week.

Summative Assessment:
Assessment for this module is based on a debate and critical review. The debate will last for 30 Minutes. The debate will require students to present researched arguments on differing perspectives concerning current issues in Muslim societies (Outcomes 2, 4, 5). The 1,500 words word critical review will summarize and evaluate the debate reflectively (Outcomes 1, 3).

Assessment Weighting
Debate: 60%
Critical Review: 40%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Mutahhari, M. (2014) The Rights of Women in Islam, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Masud K. M. (2009). Islam and Modernity: Key Issues and Debates, Edinburgh University Press
  • Nasr, S.H. and Religionsphilosoph, I. (2010) Islam in the modern world: Challenged by the west, threatened by fundamentalism, keeping faith with tradition. New York: HarperOne.

ISD225 – Abrahamic Faiths


Syllabus

The module concentrates on the major tenets and historical events in Judaism and Christianity. As the students will have sufficient knowledge of the Islamic equivalents of these from their studies in previous modules, comparison to Islam takes place in the form of class-discussions. The key areas covered are:

  • Divine Oneness
  • Prophethood, the nature of revelation and infallibility
  • Scripture: Its history, composition, divinity and role in contemporary religiosity
  • The nature of Divine Law
  • Eschatology

Learning Outcomes 

Knowledge 
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast theological views of the Abrahamic Faiths. (A1, D1)
  • Debate the various contexts and circumstances in which these religions have developed. (A2, A7)

Skills 
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Construct and communicate well-reasoned arguments concerning the relationship between religious ideas and institutions and the surrounding cultures in which they developed. (B1, B4, C2, D3)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

A variety of teaching and learning methods are used, including lectures, assignments, class discussion and individual study. The use of questioning and small group work in class ensures that students are constantly engaged and take an active role in the learning process. Individual study will consist of general reading, specific historical texts and reading on selected topics.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment includes a class presentation of a critical review of a theme covered within the course syllabus, also including observation of group exercises on chosen themes. Revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, addressing student understanding and providing constructive formative feedback to students.  Tutorial time enables the module leader to give guidance to students on topics of concern and provide constructive feedback related to summative work.

Summative Assessment:
The assessment for this module consists of a 2 hour written examination, which will take place at the end of the term (Outcomes 1, 2, 3).

Assessment Weighting
Written examination: 100%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Peters, F. E. (2003). The Montheists: The Words and Will of God, Vol. 2. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

ISD223 – Muslims in the West


Syllabus

The module examines both the historical aspect of the Muslim presence in Europe and the contemporary situation. The key topics covered are:

  • The historical interaction between Islam and the West
  • Muslim presence in Spain
  • Muslims in Asia Minor and the Balkans
  • Trade exchange between Muslims and Europeans
  • The effect of the crusades on Europe-Muslim relations
  • The effects of colonization on Europe-Muslim relations
  • Modern interaction between Islam and the West
  • Muslims in North America
  • Social impact of Muslims in the West
  • Muslims in Britain and the concept of citizenship

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge 
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Analyse the context of the long interaction between Muslims and the West. (A8)
  • Evaluate the background of various Muslim communities in the West. (A5, B5)

Skills 
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Demonstrate effective development of argument and communication of ideas on key issues as related to Muslim communities in the West. (B2, C1, C2,  D3)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The basic structure of the module will be provided by the lectures, within which time will be allocated for group work and video clips. There will also be several seminars to discuss key moments and movements that have had a radical impact on relation between Muslims and the West. Individual study will consist of general reading, specific historical texts and reading on specific topics. A number of topics will be selected for special reading and seminar discussion and the exam questions will focus on these.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Questions arising from lectures form the basis formative assessment, through small group discussions leading to student-led seminar presentations. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment:
Summative, graded assessment is by coursework, which will require students to demonstrate their learning of key issues and to present their findings effectively in the form of an essay of 1,500 words (Outcomes 3). The 2 hour written examination will take place at the end of the semester (Outcomes 1, 2).

Assessment Weighting
Coursework: 50%
Written Examination: 50%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Haddad, Y.Y. ed. (2002). Muslims in the West: From Sojourners to Citizens. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Allen, C. (2010) Islamophobia. Farnham: Asghate Publishing Ltd.

ISD221 – Shi’i Islam


Syllabus

  • Introduction to the sources
  • The Prophet’s succession and politico-religious leadership in the theocratic state
  • The origins of Shi’ism
  • Principles of Shi’a Islam
  • The leadership by religious appointment (nass) and the Imamis of Twelvers
  • Leadership by resorting to armed struggle and Zaydi Shi’ism
  • The “extreme Shi’a” (ghulat)
  • The Isma’ilis
  • Akhbari, Usuli and Shaykhi schools
  • Penetration of Shi’a Islam into the Indian Sub-continent and the Far East
  • Modern Shi’a thought
  • Shi’a Islam in Europe and America

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of the module successful students will be able to:

  • Evaluate the impact of the Prophet’s succession and its impact on constructing Shi’a theological and political thought up to the present times. (A2)
  • Describe the factors which facilitated the evolution of Shi’a Islam historically and geographically, grasping the context and circumstances in which Shi’as were received by diverse peoples, races, and nations in various parts of the world. (A7, A8)
  • Debate the ideological, ethnic and geographical diversity of the Shi’a. (A7)

Skills
This module will call forsuccessful student to:

  • Discuss primary sources, identifying Shi’a ones, and critically develop arguments based on these. (B4, B6, C1, C2, C5, D4, D6)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The module will be taught through lectures, discussion, seminars, and student presentations. Students work will be developed through class work and search of primary and secondary sources.  Students will present and discuss work in progress.  Students are expected to develop their skills independently.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Questions arising from lectures form the basis formative assessment, through small group discussions leading to the development of theological understanding. Students may hand in their PowerPoint slides to the lecturer for guidance prior to the 9th learning week. They will also receive formative feedback on their presentations after completing them, and guidance and feedback can be gained from student-led discussion, which will help them improve future performance. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment:
Assessment is by presentation and written examination. The 20 minute presentation to investigate one of the main topics covered in class and to present their research in an effective manner that demonstrates a critical understanding of the issues, and should consist of roughly 10 PowerPoint slides (Outcome 4). The 2 hour written examination will take place at the end of the semester (Outcomes 1, 2, 3).

Assessment Weighting
Presentation: 40%
Written examination: 60%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Shomali, M. A. (2003) Shi’i Islam: Origins, Faith & Practices, London: ICAS Press

ISD216 – Readings in Hadith Studies


Syllabus

The syllabus will consist of reading through and analysing selected narrations from different sources. During this the lectures will provide:

  • An overview of different themes and type of tradition
  • A comparison among meanings and contents of different reports.
  • Selected traditions about God and his attributes from al-Kafi of Kulayni and al-Sahih of Bukhari
  • Selected traditions on the character of the Prophet from Nahj al-Balaghah of Radi and al-Sahih of Muslim
  • Selection from al-Sahifah al-Sajjadiyyah and other transmitted invocations.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Comprehend and discuss ahadith in their original Arabic. (A6)

Skills
 This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Evaluate some traditions in the light of the themes mentioned in the syllabus. (B3, B6, C1, D6)
  • Compare and contrast the structure and contents of the various collections of traditions. (B2)
  • Build upon and utilize ahadith as primary sources for their research.  (B2-B4, C1, C2, C5, C6, D1-D3, D5, D6)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The module is primarily skill-orientated, and so is mainly directed by the tutor in class sessions (supported by handouts and module folder material), where discussion and interaction are strongly encouraged. Samples of the texts shall be read in the class and more work is assigned for students to read on their own.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Questions arising from lectures form the basis formative assessment, through small group discussions leading to the development of theological understanding. Revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, addressing student understanding and providing constructive formative feedback to students. Oral presentation will be used to address student understanding of issues of importance, providing constructive formative feedback to students.  Further development in student-led discussion groups allows for module leader observation and feedback.

Summative Assessment:
Assessment is by written and oral examination at the end of the semester. The oral examination of 15 minutes will require students to demonstrate correct reading and comprehension of an excerpt from the core texts (Outcomes 1, 2). The 2 hour open-book written examination will take place at the end of the semester (Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4).

Assessment Weighting
Written examination: 80%
Oral examination: 20%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Al-Bukhari, Muhammad ibn Isma’il. (1997) al-Jami’ al-Sahih, M. M. Khan (trans.), Riyadh: Darussalam
  • Al-Kulayni, Muhammad b. Ya’qub.  (1377 AH) al-Kafi, ed. by A. A. al-Ghaffari, Tehran: Maktabat alSaduq
  • Al-Nayshaburi, Muslim b. Hajjaj. (2007) al-Jami’ al- Sahih, Nasiruddin al-Khattab (trans.), Riyadh: Darussalam
  • Al-Radi, al-Sharif Mohammad Hussein. (1423 AH) Nahj al-Balaghah, translated by Sayyid Ali Reza, Qum: Ansariyan Publications
  • Ali Ibn Husayn, Imam Sajjad, Al-Sahifah al-Sajjadiyyah.
  • Al-Suyuti, Jalal al-Din. (1401 AH) al-Jami’ al-Saghir, Beirut: Dar al-Fikr

ISC214 – Islamic Family Law


Syllabus

The syllabus covers the following main areas of interest:

  • Islamic Laws and legislation regarding marriage in comparison with English family law
  • Conditions of marriage in comparison with English family law
  • Maintenance (nafaqah) in comparison with English family law
  • Divorce and its various forms in comparison with English family law
  • Inheritance, succession, family settlements (musalahah), bequest (wasiyyah) in comparison with English family law
  • Guardianship and custody (walayah) in comparison with English family law
  • Islamic family law and the rights of women in comparison with English family law
  • Contemporary Implementations of Islamic family law in the Muslim world and UK: Case studies of Pakistan, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and UK

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Evaluate and justify based upon knowledge of family law in Islam and English law. (A1)
  • Analyse various schools of jurisprudence regarding family law compared to English law. (A2, A3)
  • Compare and contrast Islamic family law with modern laws and standards in the UK. (A4, A5)

Skills
 This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Discuss and break down the various arguments surrounding the implementation of Islamic family laws in Muslim societies. (B2-B6, C2, D3, D6)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

Lectures and the students’ reading communicate much of the subject matter. Seminars, presentations, class discussions, the essay and the examination encourage analysis and critical reflection. 

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment
Formative assessment is through co-ordinated independent study of reading material, followed by discussion in class to supplement topics covered and is an essential element of the programme. As part of the formative learning process each student will meet with the module leader in order to discuss their critical learning for their chosen essay. The tutorial or meeting will not be assessed but will form part of the formative learning process with constructive feedback given to the student. A draft of the critical essay may be submitted for formative assessment before the 10th week. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment
Assessment is by a critical essay and written examination. The critical essay will require students to write 3,000 wordson one of the main topics covered in class that demonstrates a critical understanding of the topic (Outcome 2), as well as a 2 hour written examination that will take place at the end of the module (Outcomes 1, 3, 4).

Assessment Weighting
Critical Essay: 50%
Written examination: 50%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Bakhtiar, L. (1996) Encyclopaedia of Islamic Law: A Compendium of the Major Schools, ABC International Group
  • Hodkinson, K. (1984) Muslim Family Law: A Source Book, UK: Routledge.

ISC213 – Arabic 2


Syllabus

The development of Arabic Grammer is made through the following topics, while linking the topics to themes in culture and spoken Arabic:

  • Present Indicative, Relative Sentences (indefinite clauses), Quantifiers
  • The Superlative, Future tense, Verb-subject agreement,
  • The Jussive (Lam), Accusative particle (Anna), Ma Zala (sister of Kana)
  • Present Tense; verbal sentences, Derived Forms, Using an Arabic-English dictionary
  • Relative Adjectives, Negation, Conditional sentences
  • The Comparative, Impersonal constructions, Derived forms II and IV, Declension of nouns
  • Derived Forms VII & VIII
  • The Dual, Colours, Derived Forms II and V, Declension re: Accusative particles INNA/ANNA
  • Similarity, Sound Feminine Plural, Nouns with additional long vowels in genitive construct
  • Dates in Arabic, Verbal nouns as subject of a nominal or a verbal sentence.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module the successful student will be able to:

  • Discuss excerpts from the Arabic newspaper, or magazine (A6)
  • Evaluate Arabic culture, history and geography (A6)
  • Debate different styles of writing Arabic as well as the differences in formal written and spoken Arabic (A6)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Read from and discuss some of the more complex structures of Modern Standard Arabic, and be able to translate sentences from Arabic into English, and vice-versa and to write short essays on familiar topics (C1, C6, D1, D4)
  • Build upon Arabic Grammar to formal written and spoken Arabic  (D2)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The module will be taught through lectures, class exercise and conversation, discussion, listing to DVD records of native speakers on different occasions listed in the textbook and group tutorials conducted in the spoken hours of the module.  Students will present and discuss work in progress.  Students are expected to develop their skill independently and in group environment. Students should attend class well prepared and complete assignments on time. All assignments must be handed in at the beginning of class on due date. Developing language skills in an on-going process requires regular study, practice at home and in class; hence regular attendance is essential.

Assessment Modes

Formative Assessment:
Students are set bi-weekly formative assignments on Arabic, and receive feedback as they are handed in throughout the year. Although portfolios are done during class, students are required to see the module leader regularly in tutorials to receive formative feedback on their performance and support with their portfolio work. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, continuously strengthening and developing students’ competence in the Arabic language.  Moreover, tutorial time enables the module leader to supported continuously while providing the opportunity for constant engagement with the language, and constructive feedback related to the development of language skills.

Summative Assessment:
Summative, graded assessment is by portfolio, which will comprise of three exercises to be completed in class, of around 350 words each, on syllabus topics assigned by the lecturer (Outcomes 4, 5). Additionally, a 2 hour written examination will take place at the end of the yearlong module (Outcomes 1, 2, 3).

Assessment Weighting
Portfolio: 30%
Written examination: 70%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Brustad, K., Al-Batal, and Al-Tonsi (2006), Al Kitaab Fii Tačallum al-čArabiyya: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic Part One Georgetown University Press; 2nd Bk & DVD edition.

ISC212 – The Middle-Period of Islamic History


Syllabus

The syllabus will consist of examining key issues during the nine centuries addressed in this module.

  • The Rise and Fall of the Umayyad caliphate
  • The Rise of the Abbasid caliphate and its Golden Age
  • The Late Abbasid caliphate and the various sultanates: Idrisids, Aghlabids, Hamdanids, Buwahids, Qaramitah.
  • The Fatimids
  • The Crusades

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Discuss the historical development following the formative period of Islam. (A2, A7)
  • Show and assess how personalities, administrative systems and social trends shaped Muslim communities. (A4)
  • Evaluate the major events that affected and shaped Muslim relations with other civilizations. (A8)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Build upon historical primary sources and apply sources effectively. (B6, C5, D2, D5, D6)
  • Describe the links of Islamic ideologies and issues with their historical context. (B2, C2, D3)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The module will be taught through lectures, discussion, seminars, group tutorials and coursework. Student work will be developed through class work and search of primary and secondary sources.  Students will present and discuss work in progress and they are expected to develop their skills independently.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment is an important part of the learning process and has been shown to help improve both grades and learning style.  As students you receive formative feedback in a variety of ways, orally, in writing, to the whole class or individually. The module leader will regularly give feedback to student regarding the progress of their coursework, a draft copy of the completed coursework need be handed in to the module leader before the 10th learning week as part of the formative learning process. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment:
Assessment is by coursework and written examination. The coursework will require students to write an essay of 1,500 words that demonstrates a critical understanding of one of the main topics covered in class (Outcomes 4, 5) as well as a 2 hour written examination that will take place at the end of the module (Outcomes 1, 2, 3).

Assessment Weighting
Coursework: 50%
Written examination: 50%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Kennedy, H. (1986) The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates. Essex: Longman Group Ltd.   
  • Lapidus, I. M. (2002) A History of Islamic Societies, Cambridge University Press

ISC211 – Hadith Studies


Syllabus

  • Introduction to various disciplines of Hadith Studies
  • History, development, and the authority of hadith as a source of Islamic sciences
  • Classification of hadith and reporters
  • The definition of sahabi (companion), tabi’, tabi’ al-tabi’un and their position in reporting traditions
  • Technical language and concepts used in Hadith Studies.
  • Biographies of major compilers of Hadith.
  • Compilation of reports
  • The six major Sunni collections of hadith
  • The position of the traditions of the Ahl al-Bayt and the four major Shi’a collections of hadith
  • Fabricated traditions
  • New Approaches to Hadith Studies

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to:

  • Theorize an overview of the various disciplines of Hadith Studies and the significance of hadith among other Islamic sources. (A2)
  • Debate the criteria used to evaluate traditions in order to differentiate an authentic tradition from a dubious one. (A3)
  • Assess and evaluate the major collections of traditions. (A6, A7)
  • Acquainting skills to analyse classical and modern methodologies for accepting and rejecting traditions. (A2)

Skills
This module will call for the successful student to:

  • Use a number of methods to evaluate traditions reported from the Prophet, the Companions and the Shi’a Imams. (B4, C1, C3, C4, C6, D2, D3, D5, D6)

Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

The basic content of the module will be provided by lectures. There will also be seminars for interactive discussion on more difficult concepts. Individual study will consist of general reading, specific historical texts and reading on selected topics.

Assessment Mode

Formative Assessment:
Formative assessment includes evaluation of text, in an advanced, critical and informative manner. Tutorial time enables the module leader to give constructive feedback to student on the preparation and development of their case studies. Tutorials would help develop students’ learning and enhance their final submissions. Additionally, revision sessions are arranged that will cover topics in preparation for exams, providing constructive formative feedback to students.

Summative Assessment:
Assessment for this module consists of a case study and a written examination. The case study will be 1,500 words in length in which students will be required to examine a hadith in relation to syllabus topics discussed in class (Outcome 5). The 2 hour written examination will take place at the end of the semester (Outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4).

Assessment Weighting
Case Study: 40%
Written examination: 60%

Learning Materials

Core readings

  • Brown, J.A.C. (2009). Hadith: Muhammad’s Legacy in the Medieval and Modern World. Oxford: Oneworld.
  • Fadli, A.H. (2002). Introduction to Hadīth. Translated from Arabic by N. Virjee. London: The Islamic College Press.
  • Nasiri, A. (2013). An Introduction to Hadith: History and Sources. Translated from Persian by M. Limba. London: MIU Press.
  • Siddiqhi, M.Z. (1993). Hadith Literature: Its Origin, Development and Special Features. Cambridge: The Islamic Texts Society.